YES! It is legal to hunt wild hogs at night in Oklahoma.

Many people are surprised to learn that it is legal to hunt feral hogs at night in the state of Oklahoma. While there are some restrictions, hunting hogs at night can be part of an effective strategy to control their population. Feral hogs are a menace to agriculture, and they cause millions of dollars in damage each year. They also compete with native wildlife for food and space. As a result, hunting hogs at night can help to protect Oklahoma’s natural resources. In addition, many people find hunting hogs at night to be more challenging and enjoyable than hunting during the day. With proper safety precautions, hunting hogs at night can be a safe and exciting way to help control their population.

The Feral Swine Control Act of Oklahoma

The Feral Swine Control Act was established to mitigate the feral swine population in Oklahoma in order to protect the state’s natural resources and agricultural production. Feral swine are considered a nonnative invasive species due to their detrimental effects on the environment and their ability to transmit diseases to humans, livestock, and wildlife. As the feral swine population continues to grow, so does the damage they cause to crops, livestock, and wildlife habitat. In addition, the increased risk of diseases like brucellosis, pseudorabies, tuberculosis, anthrax, and trichinosis pose a serious threat to public health. The Feral Swine Control Act provides aggressive measures to reduce the number of feral swine in Oklahoma in order to protect the state’s citizens and natural resources.

Feral Swine Control Act
Title 2, Chapter 1, Article 6 of the Oklahoma Statutes
Section 6-601 – Short Title
This act shall be known and may be cited as the “Feral Swine Control Act.”
Section 6-602 – Purpose
The purpose of the Feral Swine Control Act is to provide aggressive measures to reduce the number of
feral swine in Oklahoma. Feral swine are a nonnative invasive species in Oklahoma that are detrimental
to the natural resources of Oklahoma and agriculture production, and a disease risk. As the feral swine
population increases, the citizens of Oklahoma continue to see increased damage to crops, livestock, and
wildlife habitat. As carriers of diseases like brucellosis, pseudorabies, tuberculosis, anthrax, and
trichinosis, feral swine pose an increasing health risk to humans, livestock, companion animals, pets, and
native wildlife.
Section 6-603 – Definitions
As used in the Feral Swine Control Act:
1. “Daylight” means the period of time beginning when the sun rises and ending when the sun sets;
2. “Feral swine” means any hog, pig, or swine species (Sus scrofa) including, but not limited to, Russian
and European wild boar that are running at large, free roaming, or wild upon public or private lands in
this state;
3. “Owner” means any person with title to the real property or a person that has obtained a right to the
possession and use of a certain space, property, or subsurface right for a definite period of time through a
contractual lease. In the event a person is permitted to come upon the real property to perform some
specific act including, but not limited to, hunting, removing feral swine, or fishing, that person has no
“lease” but only a “license” to do that act;
4. “Remove” means to change the location of, eliminate, or attempt to eliminate feral swine by a variety
of methods including, but not limited to, hunting, killing, taking, trapping, and catching; and
5. “Judas pig tagging system” means a population control technique where a radio-collared feral swine
is released into a control area and, after a sufficient period to allow it to join other feral swine, it is tracked
down and all swine associated with the collared swine are removed.
Section 6-604 – Removal and Killing of Feral Swine
A. Except as otherwise specified in the Feral Swine Control Act, any person with permission of the owner
may remove feral swine from private or public property during daylight hours.
B. Any person who intends to kill or attempt to kill feral swine at night shall obtain a permit issued by the
Department of Wildlife Conservation pursuant to Section 4-135 of Title 29 of the Oklahoma Statutes and
promulgated rules.
Section 6-605 – Special Permit for Private Property Owner to Kill Feral Swine During Certain
Season – Other Licenses and Tags
A. During designated deer hunting seasons for primitive firearms and guns as specified in rules
promulgated by the Department of Wildlife Conservation, an owner of private property shall not kill or
attempt to kill feral swine during daylight hours that is damaging the property of the owner without first
obtaining a special permit from the local game warden or other authorized employee of the Department of
Wildlife Conservation. The special permit shall allow the owner and one person of lineal or collateral
descent to kill feral swine on the property of the owner. The special permit shall be provided at no cost.
B. All other persons shall be required to obtain licenses and tags as required by the Oklahoma Wildlife
Conservation Code and rules promulgated thereto.
C. Any person with a valid license to hunt deer is exempt from the requirements of this section during the
appropriate licensed season.
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Section 6-606 – Swine Taken on Department of Wildlife Conservation Lands – No Removal During
Period of License Revocation
A. Feral swine may be taken on lands owned or managed by the Department of Wildlife Conservation in
accordance with rules promulgated thereto.
B. No person whose hunting license is revoked may remove feral swine during the time the license is
revoked.
Section 6-607 – Promulgation of Rules
A. The State Board of Agriculture is authorized to promulgate rules necessary, expedient, or appropriate
for the performance, enforcement, or carrying out of any of the purposes, objectives, or provisions of the
Feral Swine Control Act.
B. Rules shall be promulgated pursuant to the Administrative Procedures Act.
Section 6-608 – Importing Live Feral Swine into State – Disease Testing
A. No person shall import live feral swine into this state unless the live feral swine are going directly to a
slaughter facility in a sealed trailer and accompanied by a USDA VS 1-27 permit for the movement of
restricted animals. All feral swine in this state that test positive for brucellosis or pseudorabies shall be
immediately sent directly to slaughter or slaughtered on the premises pursuant to an order issued by the
State Veterinarian.
Section 6-609 – Promulgation of Rules for Testing and Intrastate Movement of Feral Swine –
Transporter License
A. The State Board of Agriculture shall promulgate rules for the testing and intrastate movement of live
feral swine.
B. All persons that transport live feral swine in this state shall be required to obtain a transporter license
from the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry.
C. Live feral swine shall only be transported to the following:
1. A licensed sporting facility;
2. A licensed handling facility;
3. Directly to an approved slaughter facility; or
4. Pursuant to an order issued by the State Veterinarian.
Section 6-610 – Prohibited Acts – Administrative Penalties and Fines
A. It shall be unlawful and a violation of the Feral Swine Control Act for any person:
1. To refuse an inspection;
2. To fail to comply with importation, testing, permitting, licensing, or transportation requirements; 3. To
fail to pay any fee, administrative fine, or penalty;
4. To fail to comply with any Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry order; or
5. To violate any provision of the Oklahoma Feral Swine Control Act, Oklahoma Agricultural Code, or
Oklahoma Wildlife Conservation Code.
B. Any person that violates the Feral Swine Control Act shall be assessed a penalty or an administrative
fine pursuant to Section 2-18 of Title 2 of the Oklahoma Statutes. Section 6-611 – Felony Violations –
Punishment and Fines
A. No person shall intentionally or knowingly release or engage in, sponsor, instigate, assist, or profit
from the release of any hog, boar, swine, or pig to live in a wild or feral state upon public or private lands,
except for:
1. Release into a licensed sporting facility pursuant to the Feral Swine Control Act; or
2. When utilizing the Judas pig tagging system, release onto the same private land on which a feral hog
was trapped or caught. In order to come under the release authorization of this paragraph, the release must
occur within twenty-four (24) hours of the capture of the hog.
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B. No person shall knowingly or intentionally violate the importation, testing, permitting, licensing, and
transportation requirements contained in the Feral Swine Control Act and rules promulgated thereto.
C. Any person violating the provisions of this section is guilty of a felony and subject to a maximum
punishment of two (2) years in prison, a fine of Two Thousand Dollars ($2,000.00), or both fine and
imprisonment.
Section 6-612 – Owner Responsible for Damages Caused by Unrestrained Feral Swine
All feral swine shall be restrained by the owner at all times and seasons of the year from running at large
in this state. Any damages caused by feral swine trespassing upon lands of another shall be recovered in
any manner provided by law.
Section 6-613
A person shall not be considered the owner of a feral swine if, within a twenty-four-hour period, the
person catches, tags, and releases the feral swine in the same location that it was caught.
Section 6-614
Recognizing the success of other states, like Mississippi and New Mexico, utilizing the Judas pig tagging
system, the Legislature encourages using the Judas pig tagging system as an effective technique of
hunting and controlling the feral swine population.
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Feral Swine Control Act – Administrative Rules
Title 35, Chapter 15, Subchapter 34 of the Oklahoma Administrative Code
35:15-34-1. Purpose
The purpose of these rules is to implement the provisions of the Feral Swine Control Act and to adopt
aggressive measures for the eradication of all feral swine in the State of Oklahoma. Feral swine are a nonnative invasive species to Oklahoma that detrimentally impact agricultural production and natural
resources in Oklahoma. As feral swine populations increase, citizens of Oklahoma suffer damage to
crops, livestock and wildlife habitat. Feral swine pose a health risk to humans, livestock, companion
animals and native wildlife. The Department’s goal is to render the State of Oklahoma free of feral swine.
The Department shall investigate and implement new population control methods, technologies, and
toxicants as they become available to achieve this goal.
35:15-34-2. Definitions
The following words and terms, when used in this Subchapter, shall have the following meaning,
unless the context clearly indicates otherwise:
“Feral swine” means any hog, pig, or swine species (Sus scrofa) including, but not limited to,
Russian and European wild boar that are running at large, free roaming, or wild upon public or private
lands in this state, and shall also include any hog, pig, or swine species that has lived any part of its life
running at large, free roaming, or wild. The term feral swine shall also include any feral phenotype swine,
whether or not running at large, free roaming, or wild.
“Feral swine facility” means a handling facility, holding pen, or sporting facility.
“Feral Swine Free Zone” means any region of the state defined by the Board of Agriculture where
hunting feral swine or taking feral swine from the region is restricted and the licensing of feral swine
facilities or movement of feral swine into or across the region is prohibited.
“Handling facility” means any premises maintaining feral swine in captivity for the purpose of
temporary holding, breeding, slaughter, re-sale, dog training, competition, exhibition, personal use, or any
other purpose.
“Sporting facility” means any premises maintaining feral swine in captivity intended for hunting and
feral swine are only removed from the premises through hunting.
“Transport” means intrastate or interstate movement of one or more feral swine.
35:15-34-3. Importation and transportation of feral swine
(a) No person shall import live feral swine into the State of Oklahoma unless the live feral swine are
transported directly to a slaughter facility in a sealed trailer and are accompanied by a written consent
order to enter the state signed by the State Veterinarian and a USDA vs 1-27 permit for the movement of
restricted animals.
(b) No person shall transport feral swine within the State of Oklahoma without first obtaining both a
transporter license and a 24 hour permit issued by the Department.
(c) Any person who knowingly assists with the illegal importation or transportation of feral swine or who
knowingly purchases or receives feral swine illegally imported or transported shall be in violation of this
section.
35:15-34-5. Transporter license
(a) All persons that transport live feral swine in this state shall be required to obtain a transporter license
from the Department.
(b) Transporter licenses shall be active for a period of one (1) year and shall not be transferable.
(c) Transporter licenses shall expire each June 30 but may be renewed. Five-year licenses issued by the
Department prior to the effective date of these rules shall not be grandfathered and shall expire on June
30, 2017.
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(d) Application for a transporter license shall be on a form prescribed by the Department and shall include
the following:
(1) Name, mailing address, physical address, email address, and telephone number of the applicant,
(2) Drivers license number of the transporter;
(3) A brief statement describing the area for which the applicant typically transports feral swine, and
(4) A description of the vehicles, used to transport feral swine, including any license tag numbers.
(e) Live feral swine shall not be removed from the transport vehicle until released or unloaded pursuant to
subsection (f) of this section.
(f) Any person transporting feral swine pursuant to a valid 24 hour permit may park the transport vehicle
at a location specified in the 24 hour permit, so long as a new 24 hour permit is obtained prior to further
transport of the feral swine to a location specified in subsection (g) of this section.
(g) Live feral swine shall only be released or unloaded at the following locations:
(1) A licensed sporting facility;
(2) A licensed handling facility;
(3) A slaughter facility, or
(4) A location designated in an order issued by the State Veterinarian.
(h) Feral swine shall not be commingled with any domestic livestock species at any point during
transportation. Common cages or enclosures, water sources or food sources accessible by both domestic
livestock species and feral swine shall be prohibited.
35:15-34-5.1. 24 hour permit
(a) A transporter shall apply for a 24 hour permit to transport feral swine using an online system provided
by the Department or by phone during regular business hours. The transporter may either request
immediate approval or request advance approval by specifying the 24 hour period that the transporter
intends to transport feral swine.
(b) If the transporter requests immediate approval, the 24 hour permit shall be valid for twenty-four (24)
hours following approval by the Department. The online system shall provide automatic approval for 24
hour permits after the following information is provided:
(1) The date feral swine are transported;
(2) The number of feral swine transported;
(3) The name of the county in which the feral swine were acquired;
(4) The name of the owner of the property on which the feral swine were acquired;
(5) A description of the acquisition method (capture or purchase); and
(6) The name and license number of destination facility or consignee.
(c) If the transporter requests advance approval, the 24 hour permit shall specify the 24 hour period in
which the transporter is authorized to transport feral swine.
(d) The 24 hour permit shall describe the number and destination of feral swine transported.
(e) The transporter shall carry paper copy of the approved 24 hour permit in the vehicle transporting feral
swine or carry an electronic device capable of accessing and displaying an electronic version of the
approved 24 hour permit.
35:15-34-6. Sporting facilities
(a) No new sporting facilities shall be licensed by the Department. The Department may issue a license to
an unlicensed sporting facility in operation prior to January 27, 2015 and holding a Commercial Hunting
Area license issued by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. Licenses for existing sporting
facilities shall be renewable and transferrable.
(b) The owner or operator of a sporting facility shall comply with the following requirements:
(1) The owner or operator of a sporting facility shall maintain a perimeter fence at least forty-eight
(48) inches tall made of solid walls, game fence, or other material constructed in a manner adequate
to reasonably prevent the escape of enclosed feral swine, and the unsolicited additions of feral swine
from outside the enclosure.
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(2) The owner or operator of a sporting facility shall keep the following records using forms provided
by the Department:
(A) The name and license number for each consignor releasing feral swine into the sporting
facility with the corresponding date and number of feral swine released; and
(B) The name of each captive hog hunter killing a feral hog at the sporting facility with the
corresponding date and number of feral swine killed.
(3) Any person renewing or procuring a sporting facility license shall provide the following
information on a form prepared by the Department:
(A) Name, mailing address, email address, and telephone number of the owner;
(B) Name, mailing address, email address, and telephone number of the operator, if different from
the owner;
(C) Name, physical address, and county of the sporting facility;
(D) Legal description to the nearest quarter section and GPS coordinates, if available, of the
sporting facility;
(E) A map showing topography of the area with a diagram of the facility structures, fencing plan,
and perimeter clearly marked;
(F) Whether the applicant has been convicted of a felony, misdemeanor, administrative, or civil
violation of any natural resources requirements, including but not limited to wildlife, forestry,
fisheries, environment, or animal health within the past three (3) years in Oklahoma or any other
jurisdiction;
(G) Whether the property where the sporting facility is located is owned or leased;
(H) Driving directions from the nearest town; and
(I) Signature under oath “I certify under penalty of law this document, all attachments, and
information submitted are to the best of my knowledge and belief, true, accurate, and complete. I
am aware there are significant penalties for knowingly submitting false, inaccurate, or incomplete
information, including the possibility of fines for each violation.”
(4) The owner or operator of a sporting facility shall submit a report describing all feral swine
released into or killed at the sporting facility in a month by the 10th day of the following month using
forms provided by the Department.
(c) Sporting facilities may have a gate device installed in the perimeter fence that allow for the ingress of
additional feral swine but does not allow the egress of captive feral swine. These devices shall be
inspected and approved by the Department within seven (7) days of installation.
(d) Sporting facilities shall be licensed for a one year terms beginning July 1 of each calendar year and
ending on June 30 of the following calendar year. Applications for the renewal of a sporting facility
license shall be due on April 1 of each calendar year.
(e) Feral swine shall not be commingled with any domestic livestock species in any sporting facility.
Common pens, water sources or food sources accessible by both domestic livestock species and feral
swine shall be prohibited. This subsection is not intended to prohibit a licensee from constructing a feral
swine facility along the licensee’s property line.
(f) Live feral swine shall not be transported from a sporting facility to any other location.
(g) The sporting facility shall collect a captive hog hunter’s fee from each hunter using the sporting
facility and remit fees collected to the Department on the 10th day of the month following the hunter’s
visit. The captive hog hunter’s fee:
(1) Shall be collected only once from each hunter during a calendar year;
(2) Shall be valid for the calendar year in which it is purchased;
(3) Shall not restrict the number feral swine the hunter is permitted to kill; and
(4) Shall not restrict the number of visits a hunter may make to any sporting facility.
35:15-34-7. Handling facilities
(a) An owner or operator shall obtain a handling facility license prior to operation of any new handling
facility.
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(b) The owner or operator of a handling facility shall maintain a perimeter fence at least forty-eight (48)
inches tall made of solid walls, game fence, or other material constructed in a manner adequate to
reasonably prevent the escape of enclosed feral swine, and the unsolicited additions of feral swine from
outside the enclosure.
(c) The owner or operator of a handling facility or operator shall keep the following records using forms
provided by the Department:
(1) The name and license number of each consignor or consignee releasing feral swine into or
transporting feral swine from the handling facility and the corresponding date and number of feral
swine released or transported;
(2) The number of feral swine that are killed at the facility and corresponding dates; and
(3) The number of feral hogs that die of natural causes at the facility and corresponding dates.
(d) The owner or operator of a handling facility shall submit a report describing all feral swine released
into, killed, or dying by natural causes at the handling facility in a month by the 10th day of the following
month using forms provided by the Department.
(e) Any person applying for a handling facility license shall provide the following information on a form
prepared by the Department:
(1) Name, mailing address, email address and telephone number of the owner;
(2) Name, mailing address, email address, and telephone number of the operator, if different from the
owner;
(3) Name, physical address, and county of the handling facility;
(4) Legal description to the nearest quarter section and GPS coordinates, if available, of the handling
facility;
(5) A map showing topography of the area with a diagram of the facility structures, fencing plan, and
perimeter clearly marked;
(6) Method of carcass disposal for the facility, including carcass storage sites, carcass burial areas,
incineration approval, rendering company, composting plan, or landfill.
(7) Whether the applicant has been convicted of a felony, misdemeanor, administrative, or civil
violation of any natural resources requirements, including but not limited to wildlife, forestry,
fisheries, environment, or animal health within the past three (3) years in Oklahoma or any other
jurisdiction;
(8) Whether the property where the handling facility is located is owned or leased;
(9) Driving directions from the nearest town; and
(10) Signature under oath “I certify under penalty of law this document, all attachments, and
information submitted are to the best of my knowledge and belief, true, accurate, and complete. I am
aware there are significant penalties for knowingly submitting false, inaccurate, or incomplete
information, including the possibility of fines for each violation.”
(f) Handling facilities shall be licensed for a one year terms beginning July 1 of each calendar year and
ending on June 30 of the following calendar year. Applications for the renewal of a handling facility
license shall be due on April 1 of each calendar year.
(g) Feral swine shall not be commingled with any domestic livestock species in a handling facility.
Common pens, water sources or food sources accessible by both domestic livestock species and feral
swine shall not be permitted. This subsection is not intended to prohibit a licensee from constructing a
feral swine facility along the licensee’s property line.
35:15-34-10. Carcass disposal
(a) Owners and operators of feral swine facilities shall comply with all carcass disposal requirements.
(b) The following methods may be used for disposal of carcasses from a feral swine facility:
(1) Rendering, or composting are the preferred methods of disposal; and
(2) If rendering or composting are impractical, the owner or operator may use incineration, burial or
landfill as disposal methods.
(c) Carcass disposal areas shall be located a minimum of thirty (30) feet from any live swine.
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(d) The owner or operator shall comply with Title 2, Section 2-18.1 and Title 21, Sections 1222, 1223,
and 1224 at all times.
(e) At the request of the Department, licensees shall make carcasses available for disease testing at the
Department’s expense.
35:15-34-13. License fees
(a) Sporting facilities that are not licensed as a commercial hunting area by the Oklahoma Department of
Wildlife Conservation:
(1) Application fee – $325.
(2) Renewal fee – $200.
(b) Handling facility:
(1) Application fee – $200.
(2) Renewal fee – $100.
(c) Transporter: Application and renewal fee – $25.
(d) Captive hog hunter – $25.
35:15-34-19. Feral swine free zone
(a) Cimarron, Texas, Beaver, Harper, Woods, Ellis, Woodward, Garfield, Grant, Alfalfa counties shall be
a feral swine free zone.
(b) Transportation of live feral swine into, through, or within a feral swine free zone is prohibited.
(c) Transporting live feral swine out of a feral swine free zone shall be allowed subject to the other
provisions of this subchapter.
(d) Feral swine facilities are prohibited within any feral swine free zone established by the Board.
Licenses for feral swine facilities existing within any feral swine free zone established by the Board shall
not be renewed.
(e) Any person may hunt or capture feral swine within a feral swine free zone pursuant to the provisions
of the Feral Swine Control Act and these rules. To assist the Department with tracking and eliminating
feral swine populations, a person shall report any feral swine activity to the Department, to include but
not limited to any observation, capture, or kill.
(f) The Board of Agriculture may employ private or public entities to eradicate feral swine anywhere in
the State of Oklahoma.

Why are we controlling feral hog populations in Oklahoma?

According to the Oklahoma Wildlife Department:

  • Population growth: Feral swine have high reproductive potential, and piglets become sexually active at about 6 months old. An estimated 600,000 to 1.5 million feral swine are in Oklahoma.
  • Disease transmission: Feral swine can be infected with brucellosis and leptospirosis, which can be passed to people. Pseudorabies are found in about one-third of the feral swine population. This disease can spread to dogs, cattle, goats, and sheep. Feral hogs also can carry and transmit many other diseases.
  • Threat to wildlife: Native species are being stressed by the activities of feral swine. They compete for food resources that also support deer, raccoons, black bears, and opossums. Wildlife can contract many diseases from feral swine. Feral swine have few natural predators, and in some cases, the feral swine have begun pursuing wild animals as prey items.

 

You can read more research about Feral Hogs in Oklahoma at the Noble research institute.

From the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation conerning hog hunting and thermal optics.

Except during deer gun seasons, the landowner or agricultural lessee (with a current agricultural exemption permit issued by the Oklahoma Tax Commission) or their designated agent with written permission from the landowner or agricultural lessee may control nuisance or damage by coyotes or feral hogs day or night by any legal means of take, to protect marketable agricultural crops, livestock or processed feed, seed or other materials used in the production of an agricultural commodity. Hunting, use of any artificial light, thermal or night vision equipment from a public roadway is prohibited. Any person who has been convicted of, or pleads guilty to, a violation of Section 5-203.1 of Title 29 of the Oklahoma Statutes or Section 5-411 of Title 29 of the Oklahoma Statutes within a previous three-year period shall not control nuisance or damage by coyotes or feral hogs at night.

....Except during deer gun seasons, a landowner, agricultural lessee, or their designated agent with written permission from the landowner or agricultural lessee may control nuisance or damage by coyotes or feral swine without a permit during the day or night, and without limitation by statewide season regulations or bag limits, and with the use of any legal means of take, to protect marketable agricultural crops, livestock or processed feed, seed, or other materials used in the production of an agricultural commodity. Landowners or agricultural lessees performing nuisance control activities shall be required to have a current agricultural exemption permit issued by the Oklahoma Tax Commission. A landowner, agricultural lessee, or designated agent of the landowner or lessee may use a headlight, thermal, or light enhancement device carried on the person, a vehicle with or without a mounted spotlight or night vision equipment while controlling nuisance coyotes and feral swine at night.

You can read more from ODWC about controlling hogs. Additionally, if you need information about obtaining an Oklahoma Hunting License check here.

Oklahoma Hog Hunting Information

“No hunting license is required to pursue hog, except on public lands (see Small Game/Hog Regulations for public land information.) However, individuals pursuing hog on private land during any open big game gun or muzzleloader seasons must have the appropriate license for that season.”

The Oklahoma Feral Swine Control Association

About the OFSCA

The Oklahoma Feral Swine Control Association (OFSCA) is on a mission to capture and eradicate wild hogs in the state of Oklahoma. The organization believes that this can be done lawfully and effectively without costing taxpayers any money. Instead, the OFSCA believes that capturing and eradicating wild hogs can actually create dollars for the state. To achieve its goals, the OFSCA is working with landowners, outfitters, hunters, trappers, and others who are interested in helping to control the feral hog population in Oklahoma. The OFSCA is also providing training and education on feral hog control techniques. In addition, the organization is working with state and federal agencies to develop regulations that will help to control the feral hog population in Oklahoma. By working together, the OFSCA believes that it can make a difference in the fight against feral hogs in Oklahoma.

Oklahoma Hog Hunting FAQ

This information was last updated 7 Sep 2022, visit the Oklahoma Wildlife Department’s official website for the most current rules and regulations.

What is the best public land in the state to hunt hogs on?

Hog populations are variable and it is hard to determine the best public land on which to hunt hogs. Contact other hunters and area managers of public land for more information.

If coyote season is open year-round on a WMA, does that mean that hog hunting is open year-round?

 

When there is a deer and/or turkey season open on the WMA, only appropriate methods, hunting hours, and weapons for that deer and/or turkey season are authorized for taking or pursuing feral hogs. Also, during the firearms deer seasons (muzzleloader, modern gun and special antlerless seasons) you must possess a filled or unfilled deer license for that appropriate season, and you must comply with other regulations that apply to that season (blaze orange requirements, for example).

Can I run them with dogs for sport only on WMAs (during daylight hours)?

 

You can’t chase pigs at night with dogs on public lands during any deer or turkey season. Outside of deer and/or turkey seasons on 
public lands, you can pursue hogs at night with dogs when there are other open seasons that allow the use of dogs as a means of hunting.

Can I chase pigs at night with dogs on public lands?

 

Yes, but only outside of any open deer or turkey seasons. You can not shoot pigs at night on any public lands.

Can I shoot pigs at night on public lands?

 

No, under no circumstances (including while hunting furbearers).

Can I trap hogs on WMAs?

 

Yes, but you can not use bait.

Can feral hogs be removed alive from a WMA?

 

No, under no circumstances.

What can I use to hunt pigs on public land?

 

Consult the Oklahoma Hunting Guide for most areas. However, during any open deer and/or turkey season, only appropriate methods, hunting hours and legal equipment for that deer and/or turkey season are authorized for taking or pursuing feral hogs.

For instance, you can not shoot at a pig:

  • with a .22 rifle if you are rabbit hunting on Oct. 15
  • with a shotgun, if you are duck or quail hunting on Dec. 10
  • with a concealed carry gun while check traps or setting up a tree stand on or waterfowl hunting from Oct. 1-Jan 15 (deer archery season).
  • With a rifle while predator calling on Jan. 10
What kind of licenses do I need on public land?

 

A hunting license is required for hunting hogs on public land, unless exempt.

Additionally, if you are hunting during one of the following seasons with a shotgun and rifled slug, or any rifle or handgun larger than .22 caliber rimfire, you must possess a filled or unfilled license appropriate for the current season, unless otherwise exempt.

  • youth deer gun
  • bear muzzleloader (in open counties),
  • deer muzzleloader,
  • deer gun,
  • Holiday Antlerless Deer Gun (in open zones),
  • elk gun (in open counties)
  • antelope gun (in open areas)
Is hunter safety required for hog hunting?

 

Hunter safety certification is not required specifically for hunting hogs. However, if you are hunting on public land or if you are hunting on private land during any firearms big game season, a hunting license and/or appropriate big game license is required, and these licenses may require proof of hunter safety certification to purchase.

What about Commercial Hunt Areas?

 

Commercial hunt areas are licensed by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. These areas can not sell hog hunts, but hunters may shoot hogs if they are encountered on the area if allowed by the commercial hunt area. Hogs may be shot year-round in commercial hunt areas.

What are the rules at sporting facilities?

 

Same as on private lands. Additionally, hunters must have a $25 license from ODAFF. You can get that license here: http://kellysolutions.com/ok/swinehunter/newapplication/applynow.asp

What about “guided” hog hunts?

 

There are two options:

  • Hunt on private land
  • Hunt at a sporting facilities licensed by the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry.
What is the feral swine free zone?

 

Cimarron, Texas, Beaver, Harper, Woods, Ellis, Woodward, Garfield, Grant, Alfalfa counties make up the  feral swine free zone.
Transportation of live feral swine into, through, or within a feral swine free zone is prohibited.
Feral swine facilities are prohibited within the zone and licenses for existing feral swine facilities in the zone will not be renewed.
People can hunt or trap hogs in the zone and are required report any feral swine activity to the ODAFF, to include but not limited to any observation, capture, or kill.

How do I get a night shooting exemption?

 

Exemptions are available through an app, online or through the game warden in your county or adjoining.

To get the app through the app store on your Apple or Android by searching for Oklahoma Hog (the official name is OK Feral Hog Night Shooting Exemption App).

Exemptions are available online at wildlifedepartment.com

Fill out your basic information a copy of the exemption will be emailed to you or you can print one off.

If you choose not to use the app or the website you can call, text, or visit in person with your county game warden or adjoining county who will provide you an exemption.

Are there firearm restrictions when night shooting for pigs under this exemption?

 

No firearms restrictions.

 

Persons shooting hogs at night on a night shooting exemption may not shoot from, to, on, or across any public roadway.

The following is legal when night shooting with this exemption:

  • Night vision
  • Thermal imaging
  • Infrared technology (night scopes)
  • Spot light including those mounted on firearms
  • Vehicle headlights or vehicle mounted lights (not on public roads)
  • Pursuit with vehicle such as an ATV (not on public roads)
What is required inside and outside of the deer gun season as it relates to night shooting?

 

Outside of the 16-day deer gun season:

  • Everyone night shooting pigs must carry written permission from the landowner or landowner designee.
  • At least one person in the group must have a copy of the exemption (from either the landowner or his/her designee).
  • Encouraged, but not required, to provide notification of night shooting activity to local game warden.

During the 16-day deer gun season:

  • Only the landowner or the landowner designee (who has obtained the exemption) may night shoot.
  • Family members (parents, kids, grandkids, sons/daughters-inlaws) of the landowner or the landowner designee can assist, including shooting.
  • At least one person in the group must have a copy of the exemption (from either the landowner or his/her designee).
  • The exemption holder (landowner or landowner designee) must be present.
  • Some type of advance notification to the local game warden is required.
  • If you are not the landowner, the landowner designee or family member (see above) you can not night shoot.
What are the different types of exemptions?

 

Landowner Exemption – held by the deed holding landowner

Landowner Designee – The deed holding landowner can designate one person annually to hold his/her exemption.

Hog hunter – a hunter who does not own land or who has not been named the landowner’s designee can hunt at night shoot pigs “under” the exemption of the landowner or his/her designee.  With a copy of the exemption and written landowner permission on their person.

What if I want to shoot pigs at night without pursuing with hounds?

 

Only on private land and you must have an immediate exemption obtained through web site, app or through a game warden. Plus you must possess written landowner permission.

Can I chase pigs at night with dogs on private lands?

 

Yes, year-round. However, you can not kill them with a firearm unless you have obtained an night shooting exemption and written landowner permission.

I want to transport pigs and/or keep them on my property?

 

Under the Feral Swine Control Act, The Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry (ODAFF) administers the licensing program for feral swine transporters and handling/hunting facilities.

If for any reason a person handles live feral swine, it is strongly recommended that he or she become familiar with the Feral Swine Control Act and administrative rules. These regulations, applications, management guides, lists of licensed handling/hunting facilities, and more can all be found on the ODAFF Feral Swine web page, ag.ok.gov.

Where can I find a list of state trappers?

 

Call USDA Wildlife Services (405) 521-4039

Do I have to tag or check the animal in at a check station?

 

No, there are no tags or check stations for feral hogs.

Is their a daily limit for feral hogs?

No, there are no limits for feral hogs.

What licenses are required for trapping pigs on private lands?

 

No licenses required for trapping pigs on private lands and no rules relating to trap size, posting, etc.

What can I use to hunt pigs on private land?

 

You can use any type of weapon you want to use on private land.

Can I use buckshot?

 

Yes, any time but only on private land.

What about non-residents hunting?

 

Same license requirements as for residents as it relates to hogs (both private and public land).

Can I release hogs?

 

No. Unless it is a Judas Pig. This is a population control technique in which a feral swine is caught, radio-collared and released at the trap site, then tracked down after it joins other feral swine so that those swine can be removed. The feral hog must be released onto the same private land on which it was caught within 24 hours of its capture. For more details, go online to ag.ok.gov.

What is free hog control permit and how do I get one?

Landowners may obtain a free hog control permit from the local game warden allowing them to harvest hogs during antelope, bear, deer and elk firearm seasons without purchasing the corresponding big-game license (night shooting exemptions are also available, see below). Landowners must always call the Game Warden to obtain the permit.

How about Hunter Orange? Do I have to wear it?

You must wear a head covering or upper garment while hunting pigs during the day on public and private lands during any open big game season.

What if I am hunting with archery equipment or knife?

No hunting license needed for private land, but a hunting license is required for public land.

A filled or unfilled license (deer, elk, antelope, bear) is not required when you are not hunting with a shotgun and rifled slug, or any rifle or handgun larger than .22 caliber rimfire. You can not use dogs or a knife during any open big game seasons.

What kind of hunting license do I need on private land?

No hunting license is required.

However, if you are hunting during one of the following seasons with a shotgun and rifled slug, or any rifle or handgun larger than .22 caliber rimfire, you must possess a filled or unfilled license appropriate for the current season, unless otherwise exempt.

  • youth deer gun
  • bear muzzleloader (in open counties),
  • deer muzzleloader,
  • deer gun,
  • Holiday Antlerless Deer Gun (in open zones),
  • elk gun (in open counties)
  • antelope gun (in open areas)